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Home / Entertainment News / Iggy Azalea Talks Plastic Surgery With ELLE Magazine!

Iggy Azalea Talks Plastic Surgery With ELLE Magazine!

Iggy Azalea flaunts some cleavage on the April 2016 cover of Elle Canada.

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Check out highlights from the Australian’s star very open interview below:

On if she’s looking for acceptance in the hip-hop community: “Certain people who don’t like me think that I don’t love rap music, but I love rap music. I love it like it’s my fucking husband…. I think a lot of people in hip hop have a tough time finding something in common with me. At least white [and black] male rappers both have dicks and they’re American. But for me, I’m a white woman from Australia. I get it, but I think we have a lot more in common than they think.”

On people finding it problematic that she raps with a fake accent: “The United States has such a fraught history with race, and I don’t think I realized how prevalent racism still is and how hurt people still are until I moved here and saw it for myself. As I was growing up in Australia, it was easy to think ‘Well, that was then and obviously it’s not like that now.’ It’s not something you can understand when you’re on the other side of the world. But many people think I still live in that bubble and that I don’t understand that the United States is set up in a way that doesn’t benefit minorities. I’ve lived here for 10 years now, and I don’t want it to be that way either. I’m marrying a black man, and my children will be half black—of course I care about these things. And I understand if you’re not comfortable that I rap with an American accent, and you are totally entitled to your own opinions, but you don’t have to listen to my music. I’m still going to keep making music.”

On what she’s learned from her tough year in 2015: “I think the biggest lesson I learned is that people are going to say what they’re going to say. And it’s really hard not to get emotional or become overly sensitive about other people’s opinions, especially if you feel like they’re wrong. But I think I spent a lot of energy last year trying to explain my side of the story because I thought ‘If you could just understand my side, surely you’d agree with me.’ But some people aren’t ever going to agree with you—and that’s just life.”

On plastic surgery and her rhinoplasty: “I think, in 2016, people should be more accepting of the fact that both famous and non-famous women are having cosmetic procedures. That’s just the reality. And I think more people need to admit that shit so it doesn’t have to be so taboo—because we’re all doing it anyway. I wanted to change my nose because I didn’t grow up with a bump on it—that happened when I got smashed in the face with a soccer ball when I was 16. Now I feel like my nose looks the way it’s supposed to look. But for how long do we have to acknowledge that I got a nose job? For the rest of my life? Am I going to be 45 and people are still saying ‘Nice nose job’? Everyone tells you that you should love your body the way it is, but then it is bad to say that you want to change something about yourself not because you want to look like someone else, just because you want to? What’s wrong with that? There’s nothing black and white about beauty or plastic surgery. There are no guarantees that it will fix how you feel about yourself. All of those women [who criticize someone for having surgery]—if they had $10 million in their account tomorrow, I’d dare them not to change one thing about themselves or at least think about it.”

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